Teaching Diversity Using Anti-Bias Framework

Diversity, social justice, and cultural sensitivity & awareness are huge issues right now in the news, in the kidlit publishing world, and in the lives of our students. We’d all like to do more in the classroom to help our students think critically about these important issues, but it can be hard to know where to start. Luckily, many people are thinking about how to help educators tackle diversity in the classroom. Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, has taken a huge leap forward in this arena by creating an Anti-bias Framework, essentially a k-12 Common Core for teaching students about social justice issues.

“The Anti-bias Framework (ABF) is a set of anchor standards and age-appropriate learning outcomes divided into four domains—identity, diversity, justice and action (IDJA). The standards provide a common language and organizational structure: Teachers can use them to guide curriculum development, and administrators can use them to make schools more just, equitable and safe. The ABF is leveled for every stage of K-12 education and includes school-based scenarios to show what anti-bias attitudes and behavior may look like in the classroom.”

One Example from the standards:

IDENTITY ANCHOR STANDARD 4 (ID.4) 
Students will express pride, confidence and healthy self-esteem without denying the value and dignity of other people.

At the K-2 level, the learning outcome looks like this:
I can feel good about myself without being mean or making other people feel bad.

At the 3-5 level, students can understand:
I can feel good about my identity without making someone else feel badly about who they are.

The middle school outcome expands on this concept:
I feel good about my many identities and know they don’t make me better than people with other identities.

By senior year, students can understand:
I express pride and confidence in my identity without perceiving or treating anyone else as inferior.

You can view the full list of standards here.

 

Try the ABF Using These Books About Multiculturalism:

How are we the same and different?

Kids' Book Publisher: Crabtree Publishing Company

How are we the same and different?

by Bobbie Kalman
ISBN: 9780778790433
Children often feel that they need to be the same as everyone else. That is the main reason for unhappiness. Do we see our differences as reasons for judgment and fighting? How can we view the different ways of others as things to enjoy, rather than criticize? This book encourages children to honor their own uniqueness and that of others through new ideas and positive actions.

 

Thirty-Three Multicultural Tales To Tell

Kids' Book Publisher: August House

Thirty-Three Multicultural Tales To Tell

by Pleasant DeSpain
ISBN: 9780874832662

When a story shares a universal message, it finds its way into that pantheon of tales that is shared with many diverse cultures. These classic 33 tales, collected from Brazil, China, Korea, Russia, Tibet, Africa, from America’s native peoples, and other lands, are chosen for their timeless shared values.

 

We Share One World

Kids' Book Publisher: Illumination Arts Publishing

We Share One World

by Jane E. Hoffelt (author), Marty Husted (illustrator)
ISBN: 9780970190789

Children are never too young to begin exploring the many different cultures that make up our beautiful world. Whether we awaken to the wind blowing from the desert, the spray from an ocean wave, or snowflakes dusting the trees, we all share this truly magnificent planet.

 

Kids Around the World

Kids' Book Publisher: Teacher Created Materials

Kids Around the World

by Dona Herweck Rice
ISBN: 9781433335990

This book gives kids a chance to meet other kids from different cultures around the world. Reads at a level of 1.9 and has a word count of 294.

 

One Land, Many Cultures

Kids' Book Publisher: Rourke Publishing

One Land, Many Cultures

by Maureen Picard Robins
ISBN: 9781618104014

This title addresses how America Is a melting pot filled with people from all over the world. Learning about their native language, the foods they eat, and their customs are just some of the issues addressed in this book. Maps that show the different parts of the world where their ancestors came from are an added feature.

 

Or These Books About Specific Cultural Groups:

Rourke's Native American History and Culture Encyclopedia, Volume 1

Kids' Book Publisher: Rourke Publishing

Rourke’s Native American History and Culture Encyclopedia

ISBN: 9781604727074

Volumes 1–10

 

 

Modern Middle East

Kids' Book Publisher: Teacher Created Materials

Modern Middle East

by Blane Conklin
ISBN: 9780743906746

The Middle East is a place of conflict based on the controversial nation of Israel, religious extremism, and the Middle Eastern oil supply. The Middle East produces 65% of the world’s oil. Oil has been responsible for many interactions between industrialized countries and the Middle East. Many times, those interactions have led to conflict. Its history and culture provide insight and understanding to world events taking place there.

 

Afghanistan

Kids' Book Publisher: Rourke Publishing

Afghanistan

by Michael Burgan
ISBN: 9781604723496

Provides the most current information on the people, culture, and conflicts of Afghanistan. Maps, photographs, and other text features help to support understanding.

 

What Will You Be, Sara Mee?

Kids' Book Publisher: Charlesbridge

What Will You Be, Sara Mee?

by Anne Sibley O’brien Kate Aver Avraham (author), Ann Sibley O’Brien (illustrator)   

ISBN: 9781580892117

Will she be an artist? A cook? A writer?

Sara Mee is turning one, and her family and friends gather for her tol, or first-birthday celebration. Food and presents abound, but most exciting of all is the traditional Korean prophecy game, called the toljabee, which predicts what Sara Mee will be when she grows up.

A book for all cultures, What Will You Be, Sara Mee? celebrates siblings, community, and the blending of traditions.

This book is good for your brain because:

Multicultural, World History, Korean Traditions & Customs

 

Tito, the Firefighter / Tito, el bombero

Kids' Book Publisher: Raven Tree Press

Tito, the Firefighter / Tito, el bombero

by Tim Hoppey (author), Kimberly Hoffman (illustrator)
ISBN: 9781621671985

This bilingual (English/Spanish) text has Spanish sprinkled in and, as each word is introduced, it is used from there through to the end of the book. There is also a vocabulary page at the end of the book.

Richie, a New York City firefighter or bombero, only speaks Inglés, but he answers all calls for help. In any language, a good deed is still a good deed. When Tito grows up, he wants to be a bombero. He speaks both Inglés and Español. But he never dreamed his bilingual skill might actually help Richie and the other bomberos save the day!

 

Graphic Novels: An Alternative to Hi-Lo books

Graphic novels have so much potential to heal literacy problems. Older reluctant readers won’t go near traditional early readers because of the stigma attached to reading a book that’s obviously meant for younger kids. There is a large market, therefore, for Hi-Lo books. The folks who can accomplish the task of writing a highly-engaging, well-written novel on, say, a first-grade reading level have my undying admiration. That can’t be an easy task. But Graphic Novels make an excellent, and in some ways more natural, alternative for struggling and reluctant readers.

There are many reasons that kids struggle to read. One is that they are not mentally ready to make the leap from reading pictures, which concretely represent their subject, to reading words. Words are an abstraction. They don’t look like their subject. Instead, they are symbols that represent sounds that make up words which are given as designations for an object. While a child may recognize the designating word when it is spoken, making a connection between little visual squiggles that do NOT look like the object, and a mental picture of the object is actually quite a leap in cognition. It’s kind of amazing that we do it at all, but for some kids this leap just does not come as naturally or as quickly as it does for their peers.

That’s where graphic novels come in. They can provide a more natural transition between picture books and full-text novels. The brunt of the story-telling burden in a graphic novel lies in the pictures, so the stories can be quite complex and engaging, but they still contain words as an integral part, so the learner is still increasing her literacy level. And because kids tend to love reading them, they practice more and more.

 

Try These Graphic Classic Adaptations for a Start

The Call of the Wild

Kids' Book Publisher: Saddleback Educational Publishing

The Call of the Wild

by Jack London
ISBN: 9781602911437

Follow the adventures of Buck, a loving family pet, who is stolen from his comfortable home to become a sled dog in the Yukon gold rush territory. As Buck faces freezing temperatures, starvation, and cruelty, he learns that he must be brutal to survive.

 

Moby Dick

Kids' Book Publisher: Saddleback Educational Publishing

Moby Dick

by Herman Melville
ISBN: 9781602911611

Moby Dick is an exciting story about Captain Ahab’s compelling obsession to get his revenge and defeat the Great White Whale. The story truly portrays the tragedy of hatred. This timeless epic is considered one of the strangest yet most powerful stories ever written.

 

The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Kids' Book Publisher: Saddleback Educational Publishing

The Hunchback of Notre Dame

by Victor Hugo
ISBN: 9781602911536

The Hunchback of Notre Dame is one of Victor Hugo’s greatest accomplishments. This gothic tale about Dom Frollo, the archdeacon of Notre Dame Cathedral, and his total infatuation and frustration for the beautiful La Esmeralda ends in disaster. The pathetic and disfigured Quasimodo, the hunchbacked bell ringer, is forced to choose between his two loves- Dom Frollo and La Esmeralda.

 

A Christmas Carol

Kids' Book Publisher: Saddleback Educational Publishing

A Christmas Carol

by Charles Dickens
ISBN: 9781602911444

A Christmas Carol is without question one of Charles Dickens’ greatest works. This extremely popular story introduces some of the most timeless, internationally known characters such as Scrooge, the unforgettable miser; Bob Cratchit, the underpaid clerk; and Tiny Tim, Cratchit’s frail, loving son.

 

 

Back to School for Teachers

As a teacher, you may have spent this past summer learning new concepts and skills, attending classes, or possibly visiting places.  Now, it is time to start heading back to school! Now breathe….. Big Universe is here to support you!  Below are some great ways to help you transition back into the classroom after the summer break.

First, Big Universe has Lesson Plans available to help you through out the school year.  With common core and the push for informational text literacy, lesson planning will be a snap.  Don’t forget to use the writing tab that has ready to use lesson plans. You can also visit Big Universe for reading, math, and science materials that aligned to state standards.

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Second, set up a literacy center.  Simply use Big Universe.com on a few internet ready devices.  Review how to login and you are ready to go!  You can assign books for the small groups to read or select read aloud titles for them to listen to.

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Next, select a few titles to share with your students on the opening day.  There are great back to school texts that will help build relationships in the classroom. Simply use your computer and projector for better viewing!

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Lastly, continue your Professional Development. There are videos available for you to use or you can schedule your own session.  This a great way to either review or learn new ways to use Big Universe.

You are now ready for your big day!  You will do great!

Lessons In Making Lunch: Teaching About Kids Math, Health and Literacy

 

Teaching Students Valuable Skills While Making Lunch

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Parents and educators can utilize the time while making lunch to teacher valuable math and literacy skills. Texts from various genres can be read to introduce kids to new vocabulary and content. Students can learn mathematical concepts such as ratios, fractions and proportions. They can practice addition, subtraction, multiplication and division skills. Teachers can make classroom graphs, like the one that is featured in the text below.

Our Harvest Lunch by Suzanne Barchers Join the Garcia kids on their harvest adventure at their grandparents’ apple orchard. Picking apples, eating apple pie, and bobbing for apples are just a few of the fun things they will do there. The kids will help prepare a big lunch for everyone. They will also plan games. They will use two-digit subtraction to help them with the menu, shop for food, and set up the games. What is your favorite apple game or treat? 32pp.

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Books About Lunch For All Ages

Readers have the opportunity to enjoy these titles about going to lunch. These books offer a great opportunity to enrich student’s vocabulary and content knowledge. Big Universe offers hundreds of titles in many different languages on thousands of topics. Find these informational and engaging texts at www.biguniverse.com

thumb  Anansi Goes to Lunch by Bobby Norfolk (author), Baird Hoffmire (illustrator) © 2007 Anansi is invited to three parties and wants to attend them all. He gives each of his hosts a rope to tug, ties the other end around his own waist, and waits to be summoned when the food is served — but when all of the food is ready at the same time, Anansi is caught in the middle!

 

 

thumb-1.jpgLunch for Carl by Kris Bonnell (author), Kris Bonnell (illustrator) © 2009 ISBN: 9781933727950 Will Carl eat all of his lunch so he can have dessert?     Monster Lunch by Pat Skene (author), Graham Ross (illustrator) ISBN: 9781551439419 AR: Book Level 3.9 / Points 1.0 / Quiz 128004 / Interest Level LG Yummy, yucky rhyming stories and facts about food. In Monster Lunch we dine with Frankenstein, attend a burgoo and a birthday party, meet a grumpy garden dude and slurp hot zoop. Each poem is followed by an interview with the main character or fascinating facts about food. This collection of yummy, yucky, messy and hot rhyming stories is bursting with rhythmical fun.

thumb-3.jpgBugs for Lunch by Margery Facklam (author), Sylvia Long (illustrator) (illustrator) © 1999 ISBN: 9780881062724 AR: Book Level 2.5 / Quiz 36617 Bon appetit! Kudos to Chef Nature for dishing up these tasty morsels. No reader with a discriminating palate will be able to put this delicious menu of appetizing delicacies down. Bugs for Lunch caters to a full array of creatures,Äìanimal, plant, and human,Äìthat munch on bugs.From a mantis perched and ready to prey on ladybugs and butterflies, to the honey-drenched fur of a big brown bear munching on a hive full of bees, Sylvia Long’s vivid illustrations show close-up details of all sorts of creatures munching on their lunch. These colorful drawings of creatures that live to eat bugs will be your key to discovering a world of insectivores in your own backyard and beyond.

Poetry Makes Kids Giggle and Wiggle

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Monster Lunchthumb-3.jpgby Pat Skene (author), Graham Ross (illustrator)
ISBN: 9781551439419   AR:   /   /   /
Yummy, yucky rhyming stories and facts about food.In Monster Lunch we dine with Frankenstein, attend a burgoo and a birthday party, meet a grumpy garden dude and slurp hot zoop. Each poem is followed by an interview with the main character or fascinating facts about food. This collection of yummy, yucky, messy and hot rhyming stories is bursting with rhythmical fun.

 

Connecting To The Common Core State Standards

freeclipart apple The Common Core State Standards clearly outline what is expected of students at each grade level, for students in the United States. The Common Core State Standards can be found at www.corestandards.org/

Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems.

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.RP.A.1 Understand the concept of a ratio and use ratio language to describe a ratio relationship between two quantities. For example, “The ratio of wings to beaks in the bird house at the zoo was 2:1, because for every 2 wings there was 1 beak.” “For every vote candidate A received, candidate C received nearly three votes.”

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.RP.A.2 Understand the concept of a unit rate a/b associated with a ratio a:b with b ≠ 0, and use rate language in the context of a ratio relationship. For example, “This recipe has a ratio of 3 cups of flour to 4 cups of sugar, so there is 3/4 cup of flour for each cup of sugar.” “We paid $75 for 15 hamburgers, which is a rate of $5 per hamburger.”1

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.RP.A.3 Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems, e.g., by reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, or equations.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.RP.A.3.A Make tables of equivalent ratios relating quantities with whole-number measurements, find missing values in the tables, and plot the pairs of values on the coordinate plane. Use tables to compare ratios.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.RP.A.3.B Solve unit rate problems including those involving unit pricing and constant speed. For example, if it took 7 hours to mow 4 lawns, then at that rate, how many lawns could be mowed in 35 hours? At what rate were lawns being mowed?

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.RP.A.3.C Find a percent of a quantity as a rate per 100 (e.g., 30% of a quantity means 30/100 times the quantity); solve problems involving finding the whole, given a part and the percent.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.RP.A.3.D Use ratio reasoning to convert measurement units; manipulate and transform units appropriately when multiplying or dividing quantities.

Preparing For A Successful School Year

Back-to-school tips from Big Universe.

Steps For Making Back To School A Breeze

Educators, families, neighborhoods, stores and schools can work together to generate excitement about back to school. Using these simple strategies can make returning to school a memorable event.

Shop For School Supplies When They Are On Sale

Families can save money by stocking up on materials in the summer months, when they are on sale. Adults can use this hands-on shopping experience to teach their kids valuable math skills.

Post a Family Calendar

Organizing information on a calendar offers a two-fold purpose. A visual picture lets everyone know when important dates are. For young children, a monthly calendar can also teach them how to read the days of the week. Utilizing a calendar management system is an important and useful lifeskill.

Designate a Bedtime and Stick To It

Kids benefit from a regular bedtime. Research indicates that lack of sleep is one of the causes of academic difficulties. Well rested children and teens do better on tests and in school! Parents and teachers benefit from getting enough rest, too.

Prepare School Lunch Recipes and Write Them On Index Cards

Busy families can save precious time and money by creating a lunch recipe book, prior to the start of school. Kids can help by writing the ingredients on an index card and drawing a picture of it. Technology savvy youngsters can even take photos of the food and add them to the cards. At the start of the week, families can use the recipe cards to create a grocery shopping list. This can save time. Clipping and using coupons for the items also saves money.

Be Informed: Know the Standards and Expectations For Your Child’s Grade Level

It is also helpful to know the standards for the grade levels before and after. Share this information with your child so that they know what to expect. Having clear expectations begets success. Working as a team, educators, families and students can meet educational goals.

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The Common Core State Standards clearly outline what is expected of students at each grade level, for students in the United States. The Common Core State Standards can be found at www.corestandards.org/

Read Books That Prepare Children and Teens To Go Back To School

Parents can utilize the precious few weeks prior to the week of school to generate excitement about school and learning. Several thematic books for all ages are featured below.

Sharing Funny Poems and Literature Gets Kids Laughing

 

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I’m Allergic to School!
by Robert Pottle (author), Mike & Carl Gordon (illustrator) © 2007

Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781416929475
I’m Allergic to School! is the first solo project by Giggle Poet Robert Pottle, and it depicts everyday events only a former teacher could capture. It contains 18 hilarious poems and songs about the funnier-than-fiction misadventures that occur at school. The 4-color illustrations are equally entertaining and giggle-packed.

School Related Books For All Ages

Readers have the opportunity to enjoy these titles about school. These books offer a great opportunity to enrich student’s vocabulary and content knowledge. Big Universe offers hundreds of titles in many different languages on thousands of topics. Find these informational and engaging texts at www.biguniverse.com

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 At My School

 

by Laura Verderosa (author), Illustrator (illustrator) © 2011

Meet the people who work at school.

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 My New School

 

by John Serrano (author), NA (illustrator) © 2009
ISBN: 9781607190455 AR: Book Level 0.0 / Points 0.0 / Quiz NA
My new school is different from my old school, but it is also the same in some ways!

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 At School

by Bobbie Kalman (author) © 2010
ISBN: 9781427195074
Children who are just starting school will love this peek at the activities that children do in class. Repetitive text structure and close picture-to-text match help children relate to such familiar activities as playing, counting, painting, and listening to stories and music. Children will agree that school is a fun place to be!

 Interesting Books For Teens 

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 Spooky Schools

by Natalie Lunis (author) © 2013
ISBN: 9781617727993 AR: Book Level 6.1
Most days, schools are filled with students learning in classrooms, studying in libraries, and eating in lunchrooms. Yet what about the reports that something more unusual has been spotted in these buildings? Are they true? According to some, ghostly figures and creepy spirits haunt the hallways of some of Americas most well-known schools, colleges, and universities. Among the 11 spooky schools in this book, children will discover an art institute haunted by a mischievous ghost and a university in Florida where a man with glowing red eyes mysteriously appears. The haunting photographs and chilling nonfiction text will keep children turning the pages to discover more spooky stories.

Real World Math Ideas

Everyone who has ever taught a math class has at some point (possibly many points) heard some variation of the question: “Why does this matter?” Or “When will I ever see this in the real world.” It’s a hard inquiry to know quite how to answer. We know that architects, engineers, accountants, computer programmers, physicists, and (gasp) mathematicians, not to mention math teachers, use math all the time. We also know that math’s useful in order to be able to balance a checkbook, file taxes, or do any sort of financial planning, and that it’s also nice to be able to calculate a tip at a restaurant.

But iPhone apps being what they are, we know, deep down, that the student who asks these questions of us probably could survive as an adult without knowing much math. And maybe she even will. And we also know that unless the said student goes into a highly technical field, she never will need to know the quadratic equation again. Count on it.

So when faced with this inquiry, we sputter out some answer that is never good enough and then tell her to finish the assignment because here and now, her grade does depend on knowing some math. We suspect, or we wouldn’t be teaching it, that the whole question is misguided. Isn’t math, after all, really a thought-process? A new and exciting way of looking at the whole world? But how often do we really stop and ask ourselves the question? Where is math in the real world? Why is it important?

I’ve thought a lot about this question. I even designed a whole “Real World Math” class in response to it. And I’ve come to believe that it’s not so much that a student needs math in order to become a healthy, fully-functioning adult. But, rather, that understanding math, seeing where it is in the real world, and knowing how it can be used adds a layer of incredible richness to life. It’s like the best homemade cream cheese frosting ever: it’s true that you can have the carrot cake without the frosting, but would you want to?

If you’re looking for it, math is everywhere. I come from something like 50 generations of hand quilters. The geometry involved in inventing a quilt pattern is sometimes mind-boggling. But pattern-makers and clothing designers must also know quite a lot of geometry. Whether they realize it or not, illustrators and comic book artists who first make dummies must use the concepts of ratio and proportion in order to create their full-size artwork. Geometry and trigonometry are intricate parts of designing and building a house. Trees, coastlines, and the night sky are all beautiful examples of fractals . . . I could go on.

But I won’t. Instead, I’ll leave you with a few ideas for bringing the real world into the math classroom or vice versa.

 

1. Have a Shape Scavenger Hunt—The Kindergarten through 5th grade Common Core Standards in Math require students to recognize and be able to classify shapes based on various characteristics. One way to deal with these standards is to compile a list of shapes you want your students to recognize. Have them define or draw the shapes on their papers before you go outside, then set them loose in a confined area (playground or park, for instance) to scout out the shapes themselves. You can have them do a separate scavenger hunt for man-made and naturally occurring shapes (can they find an octagon that isn’t a stop-sign? Or a triangle that isn’t part of a park bench?) Then wrap it up with a class discussion or writing exercise to solidify what they’ve learned. *Bonus: this activity is GREAT for kids who have ADHD.

 

2. Create a scale model of the solar system—This one is a Ratio & Proportion exercise with a fair bit of Number & Operations thrown in and some Geometry, for good measure. Line up spheres of different sizes from a marble to a ping-pong ball to a baseball, basketball, one of those big exercise balls, etc. (Note: you can try this exercise with and without the Sun.) Ask your students: if the earth was the ping-pong ball, which would the other planets will be? Allow them to look up (or provide them with) the radii of the different planets. And give them measuring tools. Once they have settled on their planetary representations, have them look up the relative distances of the planets from the sun or the earth. Then, let them pick a scale, and go outside into a field or some really large space and ask them to make a scale model of the planetary distances. Did they pick one that was too big? Have them figure out what scale would fit in the space they have. (And for heaven sakes, please bring a camera, because this is going to be entertaining, and you’ll want to document it!)

 

3. The Stock Market Challenge—I could explain this at length, but it’s a whole game online, so I won’t bother. Basically students are given $100,000 of virtual money to invest in the stock market and they learn about interest, growth, modeling, etc. *Bonus: The teacher section includes many lesson plans that are Common Core Aligned. http://www.stockmarketgame.org/index.html

All About Pronouns!

What is a Pronoun?

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Pronouns can replace a noun or another pronoun. Pronouns are  “he,” “which,” “none,” and “you”. They make your sentences less repetitive and easier to understand.

 

Ideas for Teaching Pronouns

Activities for Teaching Pronouns at Home and in The Classroom

Create a collage of pronouns

Students can cut pronouns out of magazines and newspapers and make a collage. They can place the poster in their room or classroom and revisit it.

Become a pronoun detective

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Have children search for pronouns in environment. To make things fun and interesting, kids can use magnifying glasses while looking for pronouns.

Have the child record all of the pronouns in a notebook, just like a detective would do!

 

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Important Resources For Teachers

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Teachers can utilize online teacher’s guides that save them money and precious time! Find these resources guides for professional educators at www.biguniverse.com

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Good Grammar!

by Joanne Suter (author) © 2005
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781602914940
The Enhanced eBook edition available gives you the freedom to cut and paste any portion of the text into your own document; to project the eBook contents on a whiteboard; and more! 100 Reproducible Activities It’s no secret: practice builds skill, and skill builds confidence. By focusing on essential elements of grammar, these reproducible exercises are the ideal supplement to your language arts program. Good Grammar! covers all the bases in a variety of skill-specific lesson formats. The annotated table of contents makes it easy to locate and prescribe instant remediation. Topics Include: Anatomy of a Sentence, Sentence Structure and Syntax, Subjects and Predicates, Compounds: subjects; Predicates and Sentences, Eight parts of speech, Nouns: Singular and Plural; Proper and Common, Self-assessment and Proofreading, Subject-verb agreement, Personal Pronouns and Antecedents, Adjectives and Adverbs: Comparative and Superlative, and more…

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 Understanding Grammar: Nouns and Pronouns

by Ann Riggs (author) © 2013
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781566600576 AR: / Points 0.0 / Quiz 0
An examination of the rules behind English grammar, focusing on the components known as nouns and pronouns, which name the people, places, and things that serve as the subjects and objects of sentences.
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Understanding Grammar: Common Grammatical Mistakes

by Ann Riggs (author) © 2013
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781566600569 AR: / Points 0.0 / Quiz 0
An examination of the rules behind English grammar, focusing on the most common mistakes made by writers—including dangling participles, run-on sentences, and misused words—and how to fix them.

 

Connecting To The Common Core State Standards

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The Common Core State Standards clearly outline what is expected of students at each grade level, for students in the United States. The Common Core State Standards can be found at www.corestandards.org/

 

 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.D
Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).

Conventions of Standard English:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.6.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.6.1.A
Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective, objective, possessive).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.6.1.B
Use intensive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.6.1.C
Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and person.*
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.6.1.D
Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents).*
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.6.1.E
Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.*

Nouns, Nouns, Nouns

Teaching Students About Nouns

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Ideas for Teaching Nouns

Activities for Teaching Nouns at Home and in The Classroom

Become a noun detective

Have children search for nouns in environment. To make things fun and interesting, kids can use magnifying glasses while looking for nouns.

Have the child record all of the nouns in a notebook, just like a detective would do!

Create a noun wordbook or dictionary

Students can write the noun on a blank flashcard and draw a picture or visual representation of it. Educators or families can bind all of the noun cards together and create a noun wordbook.

More Facts About Nouns

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Photo taken from Grammar Basics: Nouns

Books That Teach Students About Nouns

Readers have the opportunity to enjoy these titles that teach grammatical skills. These books offer a great opportunity to enrich student’s vocabulary and content knowledge. Big Universe offers hundreds of titles in many different languages on thousands of topics. Find these informational and engaging texts at www.biguniverse.com

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 Book of This and That, Volume 3

Read Now Bookshelf
The third volume of this basic reading lesson that identifies nouns.

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Grammar Basics: Nouns

by Kate Riggs (author) © 2013
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781566601887 AR: / Points 0.0 / Quiz 0
A simple overview of nouns—the words that name things—including their uses in sentences, their common and proper types, and how to spot singular and plural forms.

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 Understanding Grammar: Nouns and Pronouns

by Ann Riggs (author) © 2013
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781566600576 AR: / Points 0.0 / Quiz 0
An examination of the rules behind English grammar, focusing on the components known as nouns and pronouns, which name the people, places, and things that serve as the subjects and objects of sentences.

Important Resources For Teachers

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Teachers can utilize online teacher’s guides that save them money and precious time! Find these resources guides for professional educators at www.biguniverse.com

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 Good Grammar!

by Joanne Suter (author) © 2005
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781602914940
The Enhanced eBook edition available gives you the freedom to cut and paste any portion of the text into your own document; to project the eBook contents on a whiteboard; and more! 100 Reproducible Activities It’s no secret: practice builds skill, and skill builds confidence. By focusing on essential elements of grammar, these reproducible exercises are the ideal supplement to your language arts program. Good Grammar! covers all the bases in a variety of skill-specific lesson formats. The annotated table of contents makes it easy to locate and prescribe instant remediation. Topics Include: Anatomy of a Sentence, Sentence Structure and Syntax, Subjects and Predicates, Compounds: subjects; Predicates and Sentences, Eight parts of speech, Nouns: Singular and Plural; Proper and Common, Self-assessment and Proofreading, Subject-verb agreement, Personal Pronouns and Antecedents, Adjectives and Adverbs: Comparative and Superlative, and more…

Connecting To The Common Core State Standards

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The Common Core State Standards clearly outline what is expected of students at each grade level, for students in the United States. The Common Core State Standards can be found at www.corestandards.org/

 

Conventions of Standard English:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.3.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.3.1.A
Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.3.1.B
Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.3.1.C
Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).

Teaching Kids To Love Running

 

 Using Literature and Personal Experiences To Engage Kids in Running

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As a multiple marathon runner, I enjoy sharing my passion for running with kids and adults. Educators and parents can introduce children to running at an early age. Parents can take babies and toddlers running strollers. Families can read colorful and engaging books to their kids about running. Schools can organize 1k runs and jog-a-thons.

 Group Sports Teach Kids The Value of Running

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Baseball, basketball, football, soccer…they also involve running! Spirited and energetic kids profit from participating in group sports. Improving cardiovascular health and developing muscular strength is a benefit of being on a team. Practicing running makes running easier. Practice create excellence.

Running Races Inspires Kids To Set Goals and Achieve Them

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Starting at a young age, kids can run 1k and 5k races.

My son wrote this in his kindergarten journal. He eagerly ran a 5k and won a medal! Actively participating in a race inspired a five-year-old to write about it, all on his own. Youngsters, teens and adults love to write about things that are important to them! Families can frame the written work or put them in a photo book. Parents and kids can cherish the precious memories forever.

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 Dan’s Big Race

by Rebecca Gauthier (author), Mike Eustis (illustrator) © 2012
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781620468395
Using illustrations and text, readers can identify the sequence of events leading up to a class running race and make connections to the experiences of the main character.

 

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I Am Active

by Tammy Jones (author), NA (illustrator) © 2009
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781607191391 AR: Book Level 0.0 / Points 0.0 / Quiz NA
Do you like to run and jump? Do you like to catch and throw?

Even Dogs Log Running…

Using Funny Texts To Motivate Students

Want to get kids giggling and laughing? Introduce them to Pierre, a dog whose dream is to run wild in the park!

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Pierre le Poof

by Andrea Beck (author) © 2009
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781554690299 AR: / Quiz 133919
Pierre, a pampered show poodle in training, is torn between his love for his devoted owner, Miss Murphy, and his dreams of running wild in the park. One day, an open door beckons and Pierre escapes. But, this spunky little pooch gets more than he bargains for and learns that home is the best place of all. Pierre Le Poof! is this charming character’s first adventure in a new series by author-illustrator Andrea Beck.

Books About Running For All Ages

Readers have the opportunity to enjoy these titles that teach students kids about exercise and running. These texts offer a great opportunity to enrich student’s educational experience  by introducing them to the value of exercise. Big Universe offers hundreds of titles in many different languages on thousands of topics. Find these delightful and engaging texts that helps students to learn about running at www.biguniverse.com

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 Run…It’s a Bee!

by Robin Koontz (author) © 2013
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781618104533
As Victoria and Jasper were enjoying their new sunflower, Jasper gets pollen on his nose. A bee soon arrives which sends the characters running. As they run through a baseball game screaming, Run, it’s a Bee, all the players start to follow them. As they run through the school auditorium screaming, Run, it’s a Bee, all the actors start following them. When they finally arrive back at their garden the bee lands on Jasper’s nose and licks the pollen off. He soon proceeds on his way leaving the characters feeling silly that the bee never wanted to sting them, he just wanted the pollen!

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 The Handoff

by Katherine Hengel (author) © 2011
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781612472485
Finding the “right book” for struggling learners is essential to build both confidence and proficiency. Reading supports must be seamless, so that struggling readers are not stigmatized. The District 13 series does just that—written using carefully chosen vocabulary and simple sentences, the novels offer compelling teen stories about characters that interest young adult readers. Using sports as a backdrop, these edgy and mature titles confront issues that are of great importance to urban teens, especially teenaged boys: Coming of age, dating, fitting in, friendships, drugs, self-esteem, and school. Straightforward plots move readers through the 48-pages of text quickly and efficiently with satisfying resolutions. Synopsis: All Xavier heard was two laps. He just started running! He ran the first lap as fast as he could. He passed everyone! But by the second lap, he was winded. It was hard to breathe. He had no energy. Everyone passed him.

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 No Easy Race

by Katherine Hengel (author) © 2011
Read Now Bookshelf
ISBN: 9781602919471
Finding the “right book” for struggling learners is essential to build both confidence and proficiency. Reading supports must be seamless, so that struggling readers are not stigmatized. The District 13 series does just that—written using carefully chosen vocabulary and simple sentences, the novels offer compelling teen stories about characters that interest young adult readers. Using sports as a backdrop, these edgy and mature titles confront issues that are of great importance to urban teens, especially teenaged boys: Coming of age, dating, fitting in, friendships, drugs, self-esteem, and school. Straightforward plots move readers through the 48-pages of text quickly and efficiently with satisfying resolutions. Synopsis: Central Avenue was close now. Victor knew he had to dig in. There was a place deep inside him. It’s where his speed came from. He didn’t understand it. But he trusted it. He finished one-step ahead of Marcos.

Kids Can Publish Their Books Online

Showcasing Writing Inspires Students To Write

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 Students Write Eye Catching Books About Their Interests

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Online Lesson Plans For Educators and Families

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Lesson Plans Focus On The Standards

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Students From All Over The World Share Their Books

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Connecting To The Common Core State Standards

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The Common Core State Standards clearly outline what is expected of students at each grade level, for students in the United States. The Common Core State Standards can be found at www.corestandards.org/

 

Production and Distribution of Writing:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.4
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.5
With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.6
With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

Important Resources For Students, Teachers and Families

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Children, teens and adults can utilize online writing programs that save them money and precious time! Find these resources for all writers at www.biguniverse.com

 

 

 

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