Gearing up for Testing Part II

Pupils In Class Using Digital Tablet With Teacher

As schools get ready for testing, it is important to review key testing vocabulary and concepts. Educators can help to prepare for exams with these helpful tips!

For part one of this blog visit

http://blog.biguniverse.com/2015/02/25/gearing-up-for-testing/

6. Student Self Reflections.  This allows them to write about their thinking process. Keeping a math journal is a great way to encourage math related or help them make lists.

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List-O-Mania

From the publisher “What kid wouldn’t be interested in a book that’s all about everything they like, wish for, think about, do, dream, fear, aspire to, etc. Less demanding and more fun than a journal, this is a catalyst for self-discovery, a means of expanding writing proficiency and a terrific gift. Discover, explore, comment, rate, remember, wish, plan – and make lists!”

7. Practice Editing Skills.  This will encourage students to review their writing and short answers before submitting their test.

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Writing 2

From the publisher, “There is no such thing as too much writing practice. This two-part program build skills incrementally from bright idea to polished final product. These stimulating lessons will enable students to actually enjoy the writing process. Includes Traits of Writing correlation. The Enhanced eBook edition available gives you the freedom to cut and paste any portion of the text into your own document; to project the eBook contents on a whiteboard; and more! Topics Include: Writing Frames, Planning and Writing a Speech, Writing in the Content Areas, Essay Writing, Editing and Revising and more….”

8. Read Directions Carefully.  Help students understand key vocabulary when reading directions.

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First Grade Takes a Test

From the publisher, “The children in the first grade must take a test and they are worried. When the results come back, some children feel bad. Their gentle, understading teacher assures the children that a test doesn’t tell any of the important things about them–if they are creative, kind, or are a good friend.”

9. Rest. Remind your students ” to do your best…on the state test….you need rest”!

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Getting Your Zzzzs

Jo Cleland (author)   ISBN: 9781618103499

From the publisher, “This story reminds students that getting the proper amount of sleep helps their brains and bodies function as they should.”

Lastly, 10. Brain Food- Encourage or provide snacks during testing.

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Snack Time

Tess Samson (author)   ISBN: 9781607196181

From the Publisher, “There are lots of healthy foods. What healthy snacks do you like?”

Good luck to you and your students as you begin preparing and taking your exams!

Citing Evidence From The Text: Academic Vocabulary

Students need to be familiar with the academic vocabulary needed to cite textual evidence.

writing notebook

Educators can introduce the content specific terms and phrases. Students can document them in their vocabulary notebooks.

  • Cite
  • Text Evidence
  • Dialogue
  • Direct Quote
  • Inferences
  • Cause
  • Effect

Cite

  • to quote (a passage, book, speech, writer, etc.)
  • to refer to or mention as by way of example, proof, or precedent
  • To give credit to the author

Text Evidence

  • Facts in the text
  • Something that gives proof or leads to a conclusion

Dialogue

  • a talking together; conversation
  • a literary work in the form of a conversation on a single topic
  • the passages of talk in a play, story, etc.

Direct Quote

  • Using the exact words of an author or piece of text

Cause

  • To produce a result
  • Anything producing an effect

Effect

  • The result of something
  • Influence or action on something

Inference

  • An educated guess made through observation
  • The act or process of deriving logical conclusions from premises known or assumed to be true.
  • The act of reasoning from factual knowledge or evidence.

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For more information

visit http://blog.biguniverse.com/2015/03/03/citing-evidencesentence-stems/

Cite Textual Evidence With Online Books

computer books

Readers have the opportunity to enjoy these informational and engaging texts. Sharing these books is an excellent way to get students excited about reading. These books offer a great opportunity to enrich student’s vocabulary and content knowledge. Big Universe offers hundreds of titles in many different languages on thousands of topics. Find these informational and engaging texts atwww.biguniverse.com.

Teachers can use this informative text to help students learn how to make an inference.

medium-2

 

 

What Just Happened? Reading Results and Making Inferences

Paul Challen (author)

Science never stops even when the experiment is complete. Now is the time to make sense of your data. This title teaches young scientists how to analyze, interpret, and communicate the results of their data.

 

medium-3Jackie Robinson

Using the graphics, students can activate prior knowledge–bridge what they already know with what they have yet to learn. Graphically illustrated biographies also teach inference skills, character development, dialogue, transitions, and drawing conclusions. Graphic biographies in the classroom provide an intervention with proven success for the struggling reader.

 

 

 

All About Informational and Explanatory Writing and The Common Core State Standards

 

INFORMATIONAL AND EXPLANATORY WRITING

amusementparkmath

Students can write informational pieces on many things that are relevant to their lives. Some informational piece examples are:

  • Animals and their habitats
  • Wind energy
  • Stars
  • The Rodeo
  • Students choice of topics (something the student has expertise in) swimming, skateboarding, art

informbook inform starsinformrodeoinformskate

Students can write explanatory pieces. Some explanatory piece examples are:

  • How to books (How to assemble jewelry, etc.)
  • How things in the yard work
  • How wheels work on big trucks
  • How the digestive system works
  • How the respiratory system works

howtoexplaindigestiveexplainwheelsexplainrespiratory

Sharing Informational and Explanatory Writing With Others

It is important for students to share their work with others. Students may share their written work in a variety of formats. The following lists ideas in which student can make their written work public.

Students can make their work public by placing it in the:

•Reading and Writing Center
•Classroom Newsletter
•School News or School Newspaper

Around the community in the:

  • School bulletin boards
  • City Mayor’s office

Students can share their written work with others and the community

•Students can send their informational pieces to the local newspaper (with parent permission)
•Write letters to toy manufacturers
•Students can create online books. Students can share their  and original artwork with others. Online books can be created on www.biguniverse.com

Students can share their published books with others on a virtual bookshelf.

Examining Writing Samples

Writing samples for grades K-12 can be found in the Common Core State Standards Appendix

http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_C.pdf

Other information about CCSS Informational and Explanatory Writing:

freeclipart appleConnecting to The Common Core State Standards

When preparing students for college and career readiness, it is essential to teach students to write informational pieces. The Common Core State Standards prepare students to achieve this writing goal. Starting in the early elementary grades, student read informational texts and learn to write informational pieces. Educators can share well-written information pieces and books with their students. Teachers can teach students to read these texts “with a writer’s eye”. This technique helps students to examine the style of an informational piece. The more familiar students become with informational texts, the easier it is for students to write these types of texts.

For more information about the Common Core State Standards visit http://www.corestandards.org

Text Types and Purposes

Grade K CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.2 Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.

Grade 1 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.1.2 Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

Grade 2 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.2.2 Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

Grade 3 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

Grade 4 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2a Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2b Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2c Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another,for example, also, because).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2d Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2e Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

Grade 5 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2a Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2b Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2c Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2d Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2e Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

Grades 6-8

 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2
Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories as appropriate to achieving purpose; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.B
Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.C
Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.E
Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.F
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.3
(See note; not applicable as a separate requirement)

Grades 9 and 10

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.2
Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.2.A
Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.2.B
Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.2.C
Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.2.E
Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.2.F
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

Grades 11 and 12

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2
Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.A
Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.B
Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.C
Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.D
Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.E
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gearing Up for Testing

Two Students Learning With Books And Tablet Sitting At Table Iso

The SBAC and PARCC are two tests that that have been developed to access the new standards being taught. In most states, these tests are replacing your testing in writing, reading, and the math end-of-year test. Students need to be prepared to answer rigorous questions, apply critical thinking skills and use their knowledge at a higher level.

Ways to Prepare Your Students For Exams

1. Find resources that help with higher level thinking skills.  Big Universe can filter by state content standards, concept, or skill level.  Reading text online and responding to text will help prepare your students.  These are examples that you may find helpful as you prepare your students for these tests.

Filtered by State Content Standard

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Those Lugnuts by Dennis E. Paul (2004)

It can be difficult to find interesting materials for students who read below grade level, but these hilarious characters and goofy stories will get students reading! The small amount of text per page and strong visual cues make these stories very reader-friendly. Phonetic skills get a real workout through the repeated use of words with special vowel and letter combinations.

Filter by Quiz Strand or Concept

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Walt Disney (Graphic Biographies) (2008)

Using the graphics, students can activate prior knowledge–bridge what they already know with what they have yet to learn. Graphically illustrated biographies also teach inference skills, character development, dialogue, transitions, and drawing conclusions. Graphic biographies in the classroom provide an intervention with proven success for the struggling reader.

2. Be familiar with an online test environment.

Sample Test Question

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3. Having your students read engaging stories is one way you can help your students feel prepared for their big test day!

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The Big Test Julie Danneberg (author), Judy Love (illustrator)

Mrs. Hartwell is preparing her class to take the Big Test. Knowing they have studied and are well-prepared, she helps the students practice how to sit quietly, fill in the bubbles, and follow the directions. She even instructs them on proper morning-of-the-test nutrition. As her students grow increasingly anxious about the Big Test, Mrs. Hartwell realizes she has to teach the most valuable test-taking skill of all: learning to relax!

4. They need to feel comfortable in a digital environment. Due to the online nature, all the tools the student needs are within the test itself.  The authoring tool in Big Universe will help prepare them by teaching them basic skills like clicking and dragging.

5. Review Academic Vocabulary with your students.  This is the language necessary for the  test. For researched based academic vocabulary instructional ideas click here.

Try these ideas with your students.  We would love your feedback! For more information visit Gearing Up for Testing Part II.

Coding For Close Reading

Examining Close Reading

reading_tent

 

Close reading helps students to find and cite evidence from the text. Students can answer text-dependent questions using close reading. Close reading helps students to comprehend informational and complex text. In college and careers, almost all of the text that people encounter is informational. Learners need direct instruction in close reading in order to help them unpack the text.

Coding For Close Reading

Educators can provide students with explicit instruction on closely reading the text. In order to engage readers, after reading the text, they can use coding during the second read. Coding can help readers dig-deeper into the text. The text visuals help readers to find information quickly during a visual scan.

Prior to reading the text:

  •  Browse the content

           Scan the text

Note important information such as headings, bold text, captions, italics, pictures, icons

  •  Number the paragraphs and circle the paragraph numbers

During Reading:

Box words that you don’t know

 

Put an E next to evidence

 

Put a heart next to your favorite part    heart1

 

!        Put an exclamation point next to interesting or surprising facts

 

Ο         Circle key terms, names of people, places and dates

 

Underline the main idea in each paragraph

 

Put a (question mark) by anything that you have a question about or that is confusing

 

Put an * (asterisk) next to possible test questions or important information

Questions For Close Reading

question-Mark

 

First Read-Read For Information

  • What is the text trying to communicate?
  • What is the main idea?
  • Do you have any questions about the text?
  • What genre is the text?

Second Read-Reread

  • Encourage readers to reread to find new information
  • What is the purpose of the text?
  • Note new words and phrases in the text
  • Use vocabulary strategies to determine the meaning of unknown words in the text
  • Find the answers to text-dependent questions

Third Read-Deepen Understanding

  • What can you infer from the text?
  • What evidence can the reader cite from the text?
  • Make connections with the text to deepen understanding (text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-the-world)
  • Verify the answers to text-dependent questions

Important Notes About Close Reading

Free Clip Art Book

Close Reading is needed in society today. Students need to foster habits of close reading to develop automaticity in reading comprehension. Close reading is a necessary skill. People need the ability to read closely in order to understand complex text. In all areas of life, adults and children need to closely examine text. People need to closely read driving directions. Students need to read and reread the test directions and questions. Directions on medication need to be read carefully.

 

Want more information on close reading?

http://blog.biguniverse.com/tag/close-reading/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximize Instruction By Vocabulary Tiering

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Vocabulary Tiering Leads To Student Success

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Kids encounter new and unfamiliar vocabulary words on a daily basis. To maximize instructional time educators and parents should focus on tier two and tier three words. Placing an emphasis on tier two and tier three words will help students to build the largest vocabulary.

Unlocking The Vocabulary Tiers

  • Tier 1 words commonly appear in spoken language.  Known as common or basic words, they are heard frequently in numerous contexts and with nonverbal communication. Tier 1 words rarely require explicit instruction. Students tend to learn these words on their own.

Examples of Tier 1 words are toy, egg, talk and eat.

  • Tier 2 High-frequency words used across several content areas.  They are not commonly heard  in oral language but occur frequently in written language. Tier 2 words may be challenging to readers, as they are often found in school or the workplace.  Teachers can provide explicit instruction in this type of word to help students understand it.

Examples of Tier 2 words are obvious, complex, establish and verify.

  • Tier 3 Words that are frequently used n specific content areas or domains.  Not often heard or read in everyday life, these words can pose a challenge to readers. Tier 3 words are central to building knowledge and conceptual understanding within the various academic domains and should be integral to instruction of content.  Medical, legal, scientific and mathematics terms are all examples of  types tier three words.

Examples of Tier 3 words are trapezoid, tonsillectomy, and geosystems.

For more information on instructional ideas to build students’ vocabulary visit

http://blog.biguniverse.com/2015/02/10/a-five-minute-…ary-strategies/

Online Books and Instructional Guides

nonfiction books

Educators and parents can utilize these helpful teacher’s guides to help with planning instructional lessons. These content-rich planning guides include engaging ideas to assist with explicit vocabulary instruction. Online books offer a great opportunity to enrich student’s vocabulary and content knowledge. Big Universe offers hundreds of titles in many different languages on thousands of topics. Find these informational and engaging texts at www.biguniverse.com.

thumbBuilding Vocabulary Skills and Strategies Level 5

by Joanne Suter (author)       © 2010
ISBN: 9781602911246

Here’s a great vocabulary program that is equally appropriate for younger students working at grade level and older students who have “forgotten” or never mastered the basics. The friendly look and tone of this series belies the comprehensive sweep of the instructional sequence. Every topic—from primary level phonics to the specialized terminology of essay tests—is developed “from the ground up.” Includes answer key, 144-pages.

 

thumb-1Lifeskills Vocabulary 1 Reproducible Book with CD

by Saddleback Educational Publishing (author)       © 2013
ISBN: 9781612476711

With these workbooks you can teach real life words and skills that students can practice immediately. Furthermore, while teaching about employment forms and money management students are learning essential critical thinking, writing, and reading comprehension skills. Words are learned in context through a variety of high-interest activities including: safety signs and symbols, finding a job, personal health, cooking, smart shopping, legal documents, making a budget, and more. The self-directed activities require virtually no preparation and can be completed in one class period. Topics Include: Safety Signs and Symbols, Finding a Job, Employment Forms and Manuals, Personal Health Care, Government and Law, Media and Communication, and more…

freeclipart appleConnecting To The Common Core State Standards

The Common Core State Standards clearly outline what is expected of students at each grade level, for students in the United States. The Common Core State Standards can be found at www.corestandards.org/

English Language Arts Standards » Anchor Standards » College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

The K-12 standards on the following pages define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade. They correspond to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards below by number. The CCR and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate.

Standards in this strand:

Conventions of Standard English:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.2
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Knowledge of Language:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.3
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.4
Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.5
Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.6
Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression.

Note on range and content of student language use

To build a foundation for college and career readiness in language, students must gain control over many conventions of standard English grammar, usage, and mechanics as well as learn other ways to use language to convey meaning effectively. They must also be able to determine or clarify the meaning of grade-appropriate words encountered through listening, reading, and media use; come to appreciate that words have nonliteral meanings, shadings of meaning, and relationships to other words; and expand their vocabulary in the course of studying content. The inclusion of Language standards in their own strand should not be taken as an indication that skills related to conventions, effective language use, and vocabulary are unimportant to reading, writing, speaking, and listening; indeed, they are inseparable from such contexts.

Connecting Math to the Real World

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It is common to hear students exclaim;  “Math isn’t important! All it is is a bunch of numbers. When will I ever use this except to pass the test? I am not going to be an accountant or banker.”  But as educators know, math is everywhere in the real world and the skills of mathematical literacy are as important as language literacy skills for students to learn.  In fact, math skills are so integral to many of the routine and tasks of life that many never realize that they are doing calculations or performing feats of numerical fluency until the process is deconstructed and the mathematics pointed out.

When presented as endless series of worksheets written almost entirely in numerals,  math can easily become disconnected from the daily lives of students and therefore seem meaningless to them. Like any language, understanding and using math with fluency requires students to decode combinations of abstract concepts (numbers and symbols) into a meaningful sentence (formula) and then provide an appropriate response (the answer).  And just like other languages students learn math more easily when it is connected to and practiced in their daily lives.  Kids  learn faster and retain information better when the lessons have meaning and  practical application in their daily lives.

Since daily life is full of situations that require humans to have  mathematical literacy, why not use these activities to teach students  numerical literacy. Pairing the theoretical with practical application not only makes math easier to comprehend, but more enjoyable and in some instances even extremely tasty.

 Math at Home

These content-rich mathematical texts include engaging ideas to assist with instruction in essential math skills. Online books offer a great opportunity to enrich student’s vocabulary and content knowledge. Big Universe offers hundreds of titles in many different languages on thousands of topics. Find these informational and engaging texts at www.biguniverse.com.

culinarymath

Culinary Math   Helen Thompson (author)

ISBN: 9781422289167

Cooking is a kind of science you have to get the measurements right to make everything work. It takes math. In Culinary Math, youll discover how numbers, ratios, and other math help make tasty foods you can cook yourself.

shoppinginthecity

Shopping in the City   Sara A. Johnson (author)

ISBN: 9781433304194

The city is a big and busy place with a lot of people and places to eat and shop. Discover the many ways subtraction is used every day in the city. Apply your knowledge of subtraction for each item you buy, such as a t-shirt or a hotdog. 32pp.

money

Money  Penny Dowdy (author)

ISBN: 9780778790228

This book is filled with full color artworks and images, introducing the young reader to the concepts of currency. Money explains the many concepts of money to primary readers, including understanding the value of unique coins and bills, counting money, and checks.

bankingmath

Banking Math  Helen Thompson (author)

ISBN: 9781422289136

If you’ve ever gotten a check for your birthday or saved money for something you wanted to buy, youve seen that even a little money can mean a lot of math. Understanding the math behind money and banking can help you save and spend wisely, even if you dont have much. In Banking Math, youll learn about the numbers and arithmetic that are part of everyday life. Whether youre buying something at the store or saving for a vacation, math is a huge part of everyday life.

Math at Work

businessmath

Business Math   Rae Simons (author)

ISBN: 9781422289143

Have you ever thought about starting a business? Even if you just babysit . . . or mow lawns . . . or sell homemade jewelry at craft fairs, youll need to know some basic math to help you keep track of your expenses and earnings. Businesses need math. Learn what youll need to know to make money. Who knows where it might lead you!

fashionmath

Fashion Math  Rae Simons (author)

ISBN: 9781422289174

People who make clothes need to get their numbers right. From the length of fabric to the size of a pair of jeans, math plays an important role in the fashion industry. In Fashion Math, youll learn some of the ways the math you learn in the classroom is important on the catwalk. You may even want to use that math to try your hand at making your own clothes!

Math at Play

sportsmath

Sports Math  Rae Simons (author)

ISBN: 9781422289204

The speed of a pitch, the number of points scored, the time left on the clock . . . math is everywhere in the world of sports. Learn about the numbers and statistics behind sports like baseball, basketball, and footballand youll find you understand the sports you love even better. In Sports Math, youll discover that the math you learn in the classroom is just as important on the soccer field and basketball court.

 amusementparkmath

Amazing Amusement Park Rides  Meish Goldish (author)

ISBN: 9781617723407

Some amusement park rides are so extraordinary it’s difficult to appreciate their incredible size and speed. In Amazing Amusement Park Rides, kids will get lots of help in understanding the big numbers behind some of the world’s most awesome structures. For example, the Steel Dragon in Japan is the longest roller coaster in the world, covering 8,133 feet (2,479 m) of track. That’s just a number, but when you know that if the roller coaster were laid out in one straight line it would stretch across 27 football fields placed end to end, you have a better idea of what the number actually means! Packed with large, dynamic photos and fun facts, Amazing Amusement Park Rides is sure to delight young readers as they explore the numbers behind the world’s most incredible rides. Stat boxes on each spread provide a quick run-down of the key features of each building.

 gamemath

Game Math  James Fischer (author)

ISBN: 9781422289181

Almost any game you play needs math. From poker to computer games, from video games to board games, math has a role to play. Game Math will help you understand your favorite games better. You may even find youre a better player when you understand the math behind the rules!

 campingmath

Getting Ready to Camp  Sara A. Johnson (author)

ISBN: 9780743908658

Do you know how much planning it takes to get ready for a camping trip? There is food to buy, supplies to pack, and activities to plan. It doesn’t seem like much work if you divide everything equally among your friends and family. If everyone does his or her fair share, it is much easier to have fun once you arrive at your campsite. After the work is done, it is time to relax and toast marshmallows. yummy! 32pp.

 playmath

Let’s Play!   Sara A. Johnson (author)

ISBN: 9781433304200

Did you know that you use subtraction when you play games? Everything from picking a winning team, jumping rope, and playing hopscotch uses subtraction. See subtraction in action as you read this book! 32pp.

Other Resources

http://everydaymath.uchicago.edu/teachers/teacher-admin-links/  Math resources and links for Teachers

http://www.crlt.umich.edu/gsis/p3_3  Teaching for Retention in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics: A Guide for GSIs (STEM)

 

http://www.learner.org/interactives/dailymath/ “Math in Daily Life”  lesson plans and more from Annenburg Learner

 

http://www.utexas.edu/cofa/dbi/content/math-real-life  Drama Based Instruction

 

http://users.wfu.edu/mccoy/mprojects.pdf Authentic Activities for Connecting Mathematics to the Real World

 

http://www.mathalicious.com/  Math activities linked to Common Core – middle and high school teachers

Timed Reading Helps Build Fluency

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Timed Reading Helps Develop Reading Rate and Accuracy

  • It improves reading rate, one aspect of fluency.
  • It improves reading accuracy, a second aspect of fluency, and leads to improved comprehension.

 Fluency Is APE

ACCURACY

In relation to fluency, accuracy refers to reading printed words accurately.

PACING

Fluent readers are cognizant of pacing or rate. The goal is to read at a rate in which we speak. On certain occasions, such as a timed fluency assessment, the child may increase their reading rate. When students learn to read, they may be slow readers, sometimes known as reading like a robot. Educators should teach students not to read like a robot. Fluent readers read like we speak.

EXPRESSION

Intonation or expression refers to reading eloquently. Again, students want to practice reading like we speak. Knowledge of punctuation helps them with this. A period ends a sentence that tells and should be read in a normal voice. An exclamation mark shows strong feelings and should be read with great emotion. When a sentence ends with a question mark, students slightly raise their voice at the end of the sentence.

Timed Reading  Information

Timed repeated readings should be done using books or passages the student has read before that are at an independent reading level (i.e. books the student can read with 95% accuracy or above). Most timed repeated reading sessions should include 3-4 re-readings of the same text

Educators and parents can measure how many words students are reading correctly in one minute using the timed reading technique.

Procedures for Timed Reading:

  • The student reads a passage at their independent reading level
  • Two copies of the timed reading passage are needed. The teacher has a copy of the passage and the student has another copy of the passage.
  • A one-minute timer is needed. Many cell phones have timers. The teachers stops the reader at exactly one minute.
  • Use a pencil or pen to mark the last word read by the student when the one minute is up.
  • Each word that student read correctly is counted. The total number of words read correctly in one minute is the student’s score.

Mispronunciations, substitutions and omissions are counted as incorrect. In addition, if the student skips an entire line on a reading passage, each word on the line is counted as an error.

If the student had difficulty reading the word after three seconds, the teacher should give the student the word. The word should be counted as an error because the student was unable to read the word in three seconds or less.

Students can practice timed reading with a partner, a one-minute timer, and a text passage that is at their independent reading level.

Online Resource Guides For Fluency Instruction

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Educators and parents can utilize these helpful teacher’s guides to assist with planning engaging fluency lessons. These online books offer a great opportunity to enrich student’s vocabulary and content knowledge. Big Universe offers hundreds of titles in many different languages on thousands of topics. Find these informational and engaging texts at www.biguniverse.com.

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Giggle Poetry Reading Lessons

Amy Buswell and Bruce Lansky’s Giggle Poetry Reading Lessons turn struggling readers into happy readers. Many struggling readers are embarrassed to read aloud. They are often intimidated or bored by texts that conventional programs require them to practice. So, instead of catching up, they fall further behind. Currently 67% of American fourth graders cant read grade-level text. Reading specialist Amy Buswell has spent eight years looking for remediation methods that work. What is needed, Buswell explains, is a program that improves the motivation of struggling readers, because that accounts for 90% of the problem. Four years ago, Buswell came up with a brainstorm. She knew her best readers enjoyed reading Bruce Lanskys poetry books for pleasure. The more poems they read, the better the reading got. Why not use Lanskys kid-tested poems as texts struggling readers could practice on to improve their readingusing six research-based strategies: choral reading, echo reading, paired reading, repeated reading, sustained silent reading and say it like the character reading.

 

freeclipart appleCOMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS FOR FLUENCY

Would you like more information on fluency? Visit blog.biguniverse.com/tag/fluency/‎

Chinese New Year Classroom Ideas

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Learning about other cultures can be fun and a great way to  engage your learners.  Chinese New Year is on February 19, 2015.  Below are high-interest lesson ideas that incorporate  diverse learning strategies for all types of students.

Read

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Magic Pot

Pleasant DeSpain (author), Tom Wrenn (illustrator)   ISBN: 9780874838275

From the publisher: In this story from China, when a woodcutter finds a magic pot that makes two of everything that he puts inside of it, he thinks all of his troubles have disappeared! Or have his troubles merely doubled?

This is one of my favorite lessons taught for Chinese New Years’ with a math twist.

Lesson Plan Ideas

Primary Grades Math Activity

Have students sit in a circle and pretend they have a doubling machine.

Materials :

  • one die or numbered cube
  • paper and pencil
  • marker chips

Object: Students will recognize patterns with doubles.

Procedure: Working in pairs, have students take turns rolling the die.  One student writes the number on the die down plus the number.  (4+4)  First student counts out the corresponding number of chips to partner counts out the double to find the solution.

Variations: Use a mirror to see double the amount of chips.

Connection to Common Core State Standards (Grade 1)

1. OA.A Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.

Additional Ideas

3-5 Algebra Lesson Activity

Vocabulary: input variable, output variable, t-chart, variable

This activity can be extended over three class periods depending on the depth of algebra you are teaching.

Read the text and discuss.  Introduce t-chart concept with students.  Have a student call out a number to become the input variable.  Have students mathematically find the double for the output variable. Depending on time, have students make their own t-charts. Have students look for patterns.

Connection to Common Core State Standards (Grade 4)

CCSS.Math.Content.4.OA.A.2

Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison.

Other Chinese New Year Resources

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Chinese New Year

Carrie Gleason (author)   ISBN: 9780778789796

From the publisher: Kung hay fat Choy means may you prosper and is a greeting heard often during Chinese New Year. Chinese New Year, sometimes called Lunar New Year, is celebrated in Chinese communities throughout the world. Children will love this colorful and easy-to-understand introduction to this famous holiday.

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China

Walter Simmons   ISBN: 1612113494

From the publisher: China, with over one billion people, is the most populated country in the world. China’s most famous tourist attraction is the Great Wall, which runs across about 5,000 miles of northern China. Rich with Chinese culture, this title explores Chinese food, holidays, and daily life. Eager readers will also get to challenge their tongues with a few common words from one of the many Chinese languages! Blastoff! Series

PencilPrompts for The Chinese New Year

Use them for discussion, writing and drawing activities.

Red is considered to be lucky in the Chinese Culture.  What things are red and why you feel red is lucky?

Using scissors is considered unlucky as it will cut your fortune for the coming year. Do you think this is superstitious?  Research and  write about other superstitions.

Dragons are often seen in parades in China.  Why do you think they include them in their celebrations.? What makes dragons mythical creatures?

Fun and Easy Fluency Builders: Focus On High-Frequency Words

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Read High-Frequency Words By Sight

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Students need to be explicitly taught the 200 most common high frequency or sight words.

High-frequency words are the most commonly used words in printed text. At least 50 percent of all text is composed of HF words. Many sight words are phonetically irregular. Children do not sound out sight words. The words tend to be abstract, and have limited visual correspondence. Students must memorize the words in order to read quickly and fluently.

Strategies to help students learn high-frequency words:

  • Provide students with books to practice high-frequency words.
  • Play sight word Bingo. Kids and adults love games. Games increase learning and memory recall. 
  • Use texts specifically created to practice high-frequency words
  • Make high-frequency flashcards
  • Construct tactile flash cards (students can use glue and sand to write high-frequency words on flashcards)
  • Create high-frequency word books
  • Cut HF words out of a newspaper or magazine. Glue them on construction paper or poster board.

Educators can introduce the words to students by showing them flashcards and the practicing the words in books. Students can create their own high-frequency word books and flashcards. Kids can practice with their parents and guardians at home. Tactile learners can create high-frequency words using cotton balls, felt or even sand!

Online Books For Sight Word Practice

Readers have the opportunity to enjoy these informational and engaging texts. Sharing these books is an excellent way to get students excited about reading. These books offer a great opportunity to enrich student’s vocabulary and content knowledge. Big Universe offers hundreds of titles in many different languages on thousands of topics. Find these informational and engaging texts at www.biguniverse.com.

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freeclipart appleConnecting To The Common Core State Standards

The Common Core State Standards clearly outline what is expected of students at each grade level, for students in the United States. The Common Core State Standards can be found at www.corestandards.org/

The Common Core fluency standards are clearly outlined below.

English Language Arts Standards » Reading: Foundational Skills » Kindergarten

Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do,does).