skip to Main Content

Differentiation: Content

aHKb3UyL.jpg.partDifferentiation is a one word description for a method to reach every student and provide them with access to the curriculum that fits their learning style and their interests. There are four areas that differentiation can occur: product, process, content, and environment. Differentiating content does not mean veering from the state standards or laws required to teach by law. You stick to what you are required to teach, but your presentation of the material may vary. It is the “how” of your teaching. No two teachers will teach exactly the same and ideas on how to differentiate content can very well come from within your own building. Content differentiation can be any of the following:

Continue Reading

Differentiation: Product

Children-using-digital-tablet.jpgDifferentiation is a one word description for a method to reach every student and provide them with access to the curriculum that fits their learning style and their interests. There are four areas that differentiation can occur: product, process, content, and environment. We will be focusing on product differentiation. Differentiation can be a difficult idea to grasp since so many have differing ideas on what it should look like.

Continue Reading

Differentiation: Process

iStock_000016012136Small1.jpgDifferentiation is a one word description for a method to reach every student and provide them with access to the curriculum that fits their learning style and their interests. There are four areas that differentiation can occur: product, process, content, and environment. Process differentiation is activities that students engage in for remediation, extension, or maintenance. These are the three areas that every one of your students will be working in at various times. Process differentiation can be activities scheduled a few times a week or something that you incorporate each day into your classroom.

Continue Reading

National Literacy Day: November 1st

stow-munroeFalls_img01.pngIf you can read this, thank a teacher! November 1st is National Literacy Day. Literacy is the ability to read and write fluently in a student’s’ native language. The alphabet is fundamental to literacy. By looking at each letter of the alphabet you can discover new ways to celebrate and make it a meaningful day for your students.

Continue Reading

Cross-Curriculum Literacy

bigstock-Young-smiling-student-using-he-48119156.jpgLet’s face it. Literacy is an integral part of being an effective citizen of society. Accommodations are sometimes necessary (and should be provided when required), but the most important skill you can encourage a student to pursue is literacy. Sometimes, you have to be creative when encouraging literacy. One way to do is by planning cross curriculum literacy. It doesn’t have to be complicated and overwhelming when the planning process begins. Similar to our students, you should build upon your knowledge and skill by providing a good foundation. Here are three ways that you can incorporate literacy across all curriculum areas.

Continue Reading

Halloween as Cultural Competence: A Spooky Strategy

halloween.jpgI grew up in religious schools that were skeptical of Halloween, but the delight of children to dress up as characters, animals, or haunts and solicit treats from strangers is difficult to squash.

Thankfully, most public schools have gone the way of Anoka, Minnesota (the first city to host a public children’s parade for Halloween- and self-proclaimed “Halloween Capital of the World”) and host events themselves.

Continue Reading
Back To Top