Vocabulary and The Common Core Standards

Posted by Kristy Beaudry McCain on Sep 11, 2013 5:05:16 AM

ID-10088320

Vocabulary and

The Common Core Standards

Why learn new vocabulary? Vocabulary makes reading and writing exciting! Words make things come alive. Words help readers to visualize things and create a picture in their mind of what they are reading. Long ago, storytellers told stories and the audience visualized what was happening. Words are powerful.

In addition, vocabulary acquisition is part of the national Common Core Standards. The Common Core Standards provide a consistent and clear understanding of what students are expected to learn in English Language Arts. This helps teachers, parents and guardians know what they need to teach children. The Common Core Vocabulary Standards focus on words and phrases, and their relationships.

Refer to the Common Core website, www.corestandards.org for a complete list of standards for all grade levels K-12.

Common Core English Language Arts Standards

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4a Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4b Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4c Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.

Using Common Core Standards to Acquire a Better Vocabulary

1. Be Aware of Words

Teach students to pay attention to new words. Students can become word detectives. They can use a highlighter or crayon to highlight or circle the word. Show them how to look it up in the dictionary and see what it means. Go to a reference tool (a dictionary, thesaurus, online dictionary, etc.) to find the definition. Then further expand their knowledge by using the word in a sentence or finding the word in a sentence of a book they are reading. Teach them to write the word down in their student notes or on flashcards.

2. Practice…Practice…Practice

Try to practice the word at least five to seven times in the next few days with the child. This helps the brain to remember the word for the long term.

Practice Words By:

• Looking them up in the dictionary

• Finding examples of words in written text

• Using the word in conversation

• Finding the word in a newspaper or magazine. Cut it out and make a collage.

Make a wordbook and create a new page for each word. Each page should contain:

  • a word
  • the definition
  • an example of how the word is used in written text
  • a synonym for the word
  • a visual representation of the word ( a picture, symbol or graphic)

3. Read a Large Variety of Books

Reading is an important step in increasing vocabulary knowledge. Students should read a wide variety of materials and genres. Reading books online and keeping a log of the books they have read helps to motivate students to read. Students can also add books to their bookshelf for others to see. Big Universe Learning, www.biguniverse.com offers thousands of books online in a variety of genres. Students can even read books from Big Universe Learning on a cell phone as well as a computer or tablet!

4. Use a Dictionary or Reference Tool

Dictionaries are readily available in today’s society. A small portable dictionary is a helpful tool. Online dictionaries are handy and can often be accessed from a cell phone.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4c Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.

5. Learn Greek and Latin Roots

Expand the child’s vocabulary by teaching Greek and Latin roots. Many words in the English Language are made up of word parts from other languages. called roots. Greek and Latin roots are the most common. A root helps to figure out the meaning of a word. An example of this is judgment.
Root Meaning Example

Jud judge judgment

ECCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4b Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis).

6. Study and Review Words Regularly

Review the vocabulary that students have learned. Encourage students to practice the words that they have learned with their classmates, friends and/or family. Try to teach students at least one new vocabulary word per day. Record the word on a calendar so that they can see their progress.

 

Want some additional vocabulary ideas? Visit http://blog.biguniverse.com/tag/reinforce-vocabulary/

Topics: Classroom Ideas, Common Core, Literacy

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