Close Reading

Posted by Kristy Beaudry McCain on Nov 5, 2013 2:00:53 AM

la_vocabulary

What Is Close Reading?

Close reading is synonymous with it's name. It is closely reading. In more specific detail, it is teaching students to read a text and to analyze the text. Close reading requires students to interact with text and reread it. It is like reading with a magnifying glass. Close reading helps to develop a better understanding of the text for readers. Teachers can use the magnifying glass analogy with close reading to remind students to look and read closely. Primary students can pretend to use a magnifying glass to read closely, when they first learn this practice. Teachers can even have students make large magnifying glasses with cardstock paper and use these to practice, closely reading.

Why Is Close Reading Important?

Close reading gives readers the opportunity to interpret difficult text passages. Students may even read the text at a slower rate to examine the text so that they can better understand it.

  • There is a focus on text-based answers that require students to carefully read and examine the text. Using the Common Core State Standards we teach students to closely read to understand complex text.
  • Students are taught to answer text dependent questions. In close reading, students are required to think about the text and understand what they are reading. When teachers teach close reading, they give students skills that help students comprehend text throughout their lifetime.

Important Points About Close Reading

  • Students read a text passage. They may then reread it, and use the close reading technique to better understand it.
  • We want students to use close reading whenever they encounter complex text.
  • Teacher and parents can help students by teaching them to develop a habit of close reading.
  • Close Reading is needed in society today. Students need to foster habits of close reading to develop automaticity in reading comprehension.
  • Close reading is a necessary skill. People need the ability to read closely in order to understand complex text.

The Common Core State Standards and Close Reading

  • There is a focus on text-based answers that require students to carefully read and examine the text. Using the Common Core State Standards CCSS, we teach students to use closely read to understand complex text.
  • Students are taught to answer text dependent questions. In close reading, students are required to think about the text and understand what they are reading. When teachers teach close reading they give students skills that help students comprehend text throughout their lifetime.

This is an example of an informational text that students could read. Students can closely read the text and then answer text dependent questions.

Find this book at www.biguniverse.com TheCleanTeam

Connecting to The Common Core State Standards

Key Ideas and Details

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.3 Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

Craft and Structure

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.4 Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.5 Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.7 Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.8 Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.9 Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

 

Would your like more information on reading and the Common Core State Standards? Visit http://www.biguniverse.com/commoncore

Topics: Classroom Ideas, Common Core, Differentiation, Big Universe News, Literacy

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