A Reading Specialist Talks About Teaching Reading and Phonemic Awareness

Posted by Kristy Beaudry McCain on Oct 2, 2014 6:23:21 AM

 

Researched Based Reading Instruction

Explicit, systematic reading instruction has been proven to create successful readers. Teaching all children to read in today’s diverse classrooms requires highly trained educators. Schools and educational institutions often employee reading specialists that possess advanced degrees in reading and language arts instruction. Reading specialists provide expert instruction, and assessment for all types of learners. Struggling readers benefit from working with a reading specialist, who provide students with specialized instruction. They provide leadership for the reading program, and are a valuable resource for teachers, parents and administrators. Reading specialists are highly trained and have skills to evaluate literacy programs and provide training for the staff. Using a variety of assessment tools, reading specialists assess the reading strengths and needs of students. They communicate these to educators, parents, guardians, administrators and specialized personnel such as psychologists, special educators, or speech teachers.

Phonemic Awareness Is Necessary For Reading

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Reading specialists can help students to develop phonemic awareness, which is essential in reading. Phonemic awareness is a subset of phonological awareness. Students with phonemic awareness are able to hear, identify and manipulate phonemes. Phonemes are the smallest units of sound that can differentiate meaning.

Teachers and parents can help learners to develop phonemic awareness by teaching children to:

  • Recognize and produce rhyming words- bug, rug, tug, mug
  • Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words
  • Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable words to make new words
  • Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words
  • Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words

Resources For Teaching Rhyming Words

thumb.jpgMy First Nursery Rhymes
by Kim Mitzo Thompson (author)
ISBN: 9781619380035
Baby’s First Books are perfect learning tools for your little one!

Books That Teach Word Families That Rhyme
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Count, Pronounce, Blend, and Segment Syllables In Spoken Words

Teachers and parents can introduce kids to counting syllables in words by having them clap the syllables in words. Educators should first model counting the syllables in several words.

Students can count the number of syllables in words with this hands-on activity. Students pick a word from a pile and read it. Parents and teachers can assist them in reading the word, if necessary. Then they count the number of syllables in the word.

One Syllable Words Two Syllable Words Three Syllable Words

go yellow yesterday

the happy important

run today tomorrow

Books That Help Phonemic Awareness Can Easily Be Found On Big Universe

Big Universe offers hundreds of titles that help to develop phonemic awareness. Users can enter phonemic awareness in the search bar to discover a variety of titles. Find these useful texts at www.biguniverse.com

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Connecting To The Common Core State Standards

The Common Core State Standards clearly outline what is expected of students at each grade level, for students in the United States. The Common Core State Standards can be found at www.corestandards.org/

Phonological Awareness:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2
Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.A
Recognize and produce rhyming words.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.B
Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.C
Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.D
Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words.1 (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.2.E
Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable words to make new words.

 

Topics: Classroom Ideas, Personal Experiences, Common Core, Big Universe News, Integration Ideas, Literacy

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