All About Opinion Writing

Posted by Kristy Beaudry McCain on Feb 3, 2015 6:26:26 AM

OPINION WRITING AND DISCUSSION

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The Common Core State Standards require students to share and write about their opinions starting in elementary school. An opinion is what someone thinks about a thing, concept, place or idea.

According to Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/opinion

An opinion is:

  • a belief, judgment, or way of thinking about something : what someone thinks about a particular thing
  • advice from someone with special knowledge : advice from an expert

Use Books to Teach Students to Support Their Opinions

Educators and parents can use books to teach children about expressing their opinions. Teachers can read the books aloud and point out where opinions are stated in the text. Educators can teach children how to find opinions in text and in environmental print. Students can read books in which others share their opinion. Some examples of text based on people’s opinion are below. The books cover the following topics:

  • The best__________
  • The perfect________
  • My favorite________

These online books that support sharing opinions are available at http//:www.biguniverse.com

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The Best Week Ever

by Eleanor Robins (author) © 2011
ISBN: 9781602919525

Meet the students of Carter High- they are a diverse group of teens from a variety of backgrounds. Each paperback book features a character embroiled in a typical high school dilemma. Topics are involving and pertinent to young adult readers: romance, sports, friendship, exams, work, family. In just 48-pages, even your least motivated readers can easily finish. Deb is reading problems and is self-conscious about it. She doesn’t think smart boys will like her. But she’s hardworking, helpful, and a girl of her word. Deb turns down a date to rake her sick neighbor’s leaves. Ed, smart and handsome, comes by to give her a hand and- perhaps- ask her out.

thumbThe Most Dangerous

by Terri Fields (author), Laura Jacques (illustrator) © 2012
ISBN: 9781607185444

Dangerous animals from all over the world gather for the Most Dangerous Animal of All Contest. Snakes, spiders, sharks…who will the winner be? Deadly poison, huge teeth, razor-sharp horns, and fearsome feet are just a few of the ways that animals kill. Predators mean to kill. Prey simply defend themselves. And yet, the unexpected “Most Deadly Animal” doesn’t mean any harm! Don’t let the suspense kill you.

The Best Fruit

by Kathy Gleason (author) © 2012
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ISBN: 9781620469057

Beautiful color photographs and repetitive sentences tell the story of children enjoying their favorite fruits.

Some helpful phrases that support discussion and writing about opinions:

  • In my opinion
  • I think
  • I feel
  • I prefer
  • My favorite
  • Everyone should
  • I believe
  • I really like
  • The best
  • The best thing about

Ideas For Writing About Your Opinion

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Classrooms can collect data about their favorite things. Our Favorites is an excellent online book that talks about collecting data and graphing students’ favorite things.

Helpful Phrases That Support Discussion And Opinion Writing

Educators can teach students to express their opinions by using words that support discussing and writing about opinions.

Vocabulary That Supports An Opinion

• Because…..

• When ….

• The reason….

• One reason ….

Sentence Starters That Conclude an Opinion Piece

• I think…

• I feel…

• I suggest…

• I would recommend…

Sentence Frames Can Help Students Express Their Opinion

Educators and parents can use sentence frames to support opinion writing. Some examples are:

I like_______________ because______________. The first reason I like ___________is because________________. The second reason I like______ is because _________________. In conclusion, I feel that ________________ is the best due to the fact__________.

Connecting to The Common Core State Standards

When preparing students for college and career readiness, it is essential to teach students to write sound arguments on substantive topics. The Common Core State Standards prepare students to achieve this writing goal. Teachers start by educating students about expressing their opinions in early elementary grades.

Grade K CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.1 Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is…).

Grade 1 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.1.1 Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.

Grade 2 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.2.1 Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g.,because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section.

Grade 3 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.1a Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.1b Provide reasons that support the opinion.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.1c Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since,for example) to connect opinion and reasons.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.1d Provide a concluding statement or section.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

Grade 4 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1a Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1b Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1c Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1d Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

Grade 5 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.1a Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.1b Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.1c Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.1d Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

Grade 6 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1a Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1b Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1c Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1d Establish and maintain a formal style.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1e Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.

 

Topics: Classroom Ideas, Common Core, Integration Ideas, Literacy

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