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A Frustrated, Upset Child, Or Child With Learning Difficulties.

Dyslexia is a language-based disability that affects nearly 20% of our students, according to the International Dyslexia Association,  that’s one in five kids!  Signs of dyslexia usually become more obvious when children start school and begin to focus on reading and writing. With help, children with dyslexia can become successful readers but, we as teachers need to know the signs of dyslexia to help identify those affected. Most dyslexics will exhibit roughly 10 of the following traits and behaviors. However, the traits can vary day to day. It’s been said that the only thing consistent with dyslexia is that it is inconsistent. Here are the traits and behaviors to be on the lookout for when dyslexia is suspected in a student, this list comes from the International Dyslexia Association, however, to verify your suspicion the child must be tested by a qualified examiner.

Children in Kindergarten:

  • Has difficulty reading single words
  • May be slow to learn the connection between letters and sounds
  • May confuse small words – at/to, said/and, does/goes
  • Makes consistent reading and spelling errors
  • May have trouble remembering facts
  • May be slow to learn new skills; relies heavily on memorizing without understanding
  • May be impulsive and prone to accidents
  • May have difficulty planning
  • Often uses an awkward pencil grip
  • May have trouble learning to tell time

First through Fourth Grade:

  • Has difficulty decoding single words (reading single words in isolation)
  • May be slow to learn the connection between letters and sounds
  • May confuse small words – at/to, said/and, does/goes
  • Makes consistent reading and spelling errors including:
    • Letter reversals – d for b as in, dog for bog
    • Word reversals – tip for pit
    • Inversions – m and w, u and n
    • Transpositions – felt and left
    • Substitutions – house and home
  • May transpose number sequences and confuse arithmetic signs (+ – x / =)
  • May have trouble remembering facts
  • May be slow to learn new skills; relies heavily on memorizing without understanding
  • May be impulsive and prone to accidents
  • May have difficulty planning
  • Often uses an awkward pencil grip (fist, thumb hooked over fingers, etc.)
  • May have trouble learning to tell time
  • May have poor fine motor coordination

Currently, in the United States, there are only 7 states do not have dyslexia laws on the books, but there’s some pending legislation too. This is a promising change from 2016 when there were 13 states with no dyslexia laws! It looks as though things are moving in the right direction for kids!

NO LAWS: Alaska, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Michigan, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota.

 

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